Dog Supplies Guide

ARTICLE TOPICS

SITE RESOURCES

RECOMMENDED

SEARCH IT!

Custom Search

RELATED INFO


RECOMMENDED




Free Shipping with purchase of $25 or more



GIFT IDEAS

Secrets To Dog Training Ebook

Camera Mount Dog Harness

Dog Disease

What They Are and How To Prevent Them

Dog Disease Can Be Prevented With Vaccinations

When puppies aren't vaccinated they become very susceptible to diseases. Our canine companions are prone to certain diseases and illnesses, whether or not they are in contact with other dogs because many of these diseases are airborne. It is extremely important to make sure your puppy or dog is vaccinated and seen by your veternarian regularly for the necessary up-to-date shots to remain protected and prevent these diseases from occurring.

Below is a list we have compiled of the most dangerous dog diseases that all dogs should be vaccinated for. Your puppy vaccinations for dog diseases should cover the following:

Vaccinations Prevent The Following Dog Diseases:

Rabies
Rabies is a serious virus that attacks the brain and is always fatal. Most pets are exposed to rabies by bites from wild animals, particularly skunks, raccoons, bats and foxes. This dog disease can be transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected pet. Rabies can affect all unvaccinated warm-blooded animals, including humans. While there is no cure for rabies, it can be prevented with vaccinations for the disease. The first vaccination should be given at about 12 weeks of age followed by the first booster given one year after the initial vaccination and then every three years thereafter. However, please note that in some areas local laws may mandate a greater frequency. Check with your vet if you are unsure of the laws in your state.

Parvovirus
Parvovirus is a serious viral dog disease affecting the intestines, white blood cells, and heart. Fever, vomiting, dehydration, and severe diarrhea are associated with this disease. In puppies, this disease can often be fatal. Parvo is an extremely contagious dog disease. Anything an infected dog has used and areas an infected dog has inhabited can remain a transmitter for the virus for up to one year. Dogs in crowded and stressful conditions, such as kennels, shelters and dog shows are at the highest risk for the disease. Vaccinations are started at six weeks of age and one is given every three weeks until 15 weeks of age. The first booster is required one year after the pediatric series and then every three years thereafter.

Canine Distemper Virus (CDV)
CDV is a contagious, viral dog disease that that affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and central nervous systems. It is commonly transmitted by contact with infected dogs or their environments (most commonly transmitted through airborne viral particles that dogs breathe in). CDV occurs among domestic dogs and many other carnivores, including raccoons, skunks, and foxes. This disease can often be fatal for puppies and older dogs. The only way to prevent your dog from contracting this disease is to make sure they have been vaccinated for it in case of exposure. There is no cure for CDV, so treatment is supportive. Vaccinations are started at six weeks of age and one is given every three weeks until 15 weeks of age. The first booster is required one year after the pediatric series and then every three years thereafter.

Canine Adenovirus
Also known as Infectious Canine Hepatitis (ICH). ICH is a highly contagious dog disease transmitted only to dogs and should not be confused with hepatitis in humans. Humans can not be affected by the canine infectious hepatitis virus. There is no danger to you or your family members. There could be possible danger, to other dogs living in your household. Prinarily, it affects the liver, kidneys and lining of the blood vessels and is transmitted in urine, nasal or eye secretions of infected animals. Puppies and younger dogs are at the highest risk for contracting the disease, although dogs of all ages are susceptible. As with most viral infections, there are no drugs that will kill the virus. The virus runs its course in a few days to a couple of weeks. ICH does its worst damage to the liver and can cause loss of vision. Vaccinations are started at six weeks of age and one is given every three weeks until 15 weeks of age. The first booster is required one year after the pediatric series and then every three years thereafter.

Para Influenza
Para Influenza is a transmissible upper respiratory infection of dogs which is characterized by coughing and gagging. It is also known as tracheobronchitis, which is usually mild but can be serious in young puppies. The group highest at risk for this disease are dogs in crowded and stressful conditions, such as kennels, shelters or dog shows. Vaccinations are started at six weeks of age and one is given every three weeks until 15 weeks of age. The first booster is required one year after the pediatric series and then every three years thereafter.

Bordetella
Bordetella, also known as "kennel cough", is a severe but rarely fatal respiratory dog disease. Because it spreads through the air in confined areas, kennel cough is common even in clean, well run boarding kennels. If your dog will be at the groomer's frequently or periodically left at a kennel, it is wise to protect against this dog disease. Most boarding kennels require it. For dogs that don't need year around protection, the best time to administer the vaccine is two to four weeks before going to the kennel.

Leptospirosis
Leptospirosis causes kidney and liver damage and is spread most often via infected urine. The leptospirosis portion of distemper vaccine can cause a reaction if given repeatedly. For this reason, and because Leptospirosis has become a fairly rare dog disease, your dog will be vaccinated twice during the vaccination series.

Canine Coronavirus (CCV)
(CCV) causes or contributes to parvovirus-like intestinal disease and severe diarrhea. Because coronavirus vaccine is expensive, and since the disease is usually not fatal, many veterinarians omit coronavirus protection from their puppy series or immunize for it separately at additional cost.

Lyme Disease
Spread by ticks, Lyme Disease can become a significant human health problem. Because the disease is difficult and expensive to diagnose with certainty, there have been few proven cases in dogs. When Lyme disease is suspect, it is treated with antibiotics. Dogs usually get better and it is seldom certain whether the condition being treated is Lyme disease or something else. Dogs that roam in brushy areas tend to get lots of ticks and should be vaccinated. For dog owners living near the woods, it is highly recommended to have your dogs immunized to prevent lyme disease. Those restricted to their own immediate area and never get ticks probably don't need it. Immunization is given as an initial series of two injections three weeks apart followed by an annual booster.



Choosing a veterinarian is an important decision to make for you and your puppy or dog to get set up for your puppy or dog's vaccination schedule. The veterinarian you choose will help provide your dog the necessary health care to prevent your pet from getting dog diseases. For more information on dog health precautions, become aware of dog parasites and how to treat and prevent them.



Please Note:  Always consult your dog's veterinarian before making any dog health care decisions. Your veternarian will be able to help you decide the best course of action when it comes to caring for your dog.

Return to Dog Health



none